Meg Wilcox

Toxics in epoxy

The hidden, potential cancer-causing, danger in woodworking and art supplies

Researchers say a chemical called BADGE is putting everyone from professional woodworks to weekend craft hobbyists at risk.

CAMBRIDGE, Mass.—In the basement workshop of Rockler Woodworking and Hardware, instructor Palo Coleman is wrapping up a class on epoxy resin art, a popular craft for creating sparkly jewelry or charcuterie boards and “river” tables, with vibrant glass-like features that seemingly flow through the wood surfaces.

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New York City pesticide ban

The pesticide ban movement gains momentum

PORTLAND, ME—On an early fall day, the city's downtown Fox Field and Playground is humming. A half dozen young men shoot baskets, and small children scramble over playground structures. The central playing field is wet with dew and shimmers an emerald green in mid-morning light.

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DDT Breast Cancer

Pesticide DDT linked to increased breast cancer risk generations after exposure

A woman's exposure to the pesticide DDT during pregnancy can increase her granddaughter's risk for breast cancer decades later, according to a new study.

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Metalmark biomimicry

From butterfly wings to shrimp claws: Mimicking nature on the nanoscale

BOSTON—Standing at a lab bench, Tanya Shirman eyes her creation: a tiny glass vial filled with an iridescent, sand-like material.

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Kids organic vegetables

Organic diets quickly reduce the amount of glyphosate in people’s bodies

Eating an organic diet rapidly and significantly reduces exposure to glyphosate—the world's most widely-used weed killer, which has been linked to cancer, hormone disruption and other harmful impacts, according to a new study.

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Doctor office devices medicine

The danger of hormone-mimicking chemicals in medical devices and meds

Exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals in medicine and medical devices is grossly underestimated, and physicians have an ethical obligation to talk about these exposures with their patients, according to a new study.

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Victoria Goebel evangelical environmental

Making toxic-free births a Christian issue

Reverend Mitchell Hescox was on Capitol Hill in February, urging members of the House Oversight and Reform Committee not to gut an air pollution rule that protects children from the brain-damaging chemical mercury.

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Researchers hand Michigan officials a tool to remedy environmental injustice. Will they use it?
Delores Leonard of Detroit holding up an air pollution analysis. (Credit: Adam Reinhardt)

Researchers hand Michigan officials a tool to remedy environmental injustice. Will they use it?

For decades, community members living alongside heavy industry in Southwest Detroit's infamous 48217 zip code have pressed state environmental regulators to consider the cumulative burden of their exposure to a toxic stew of air pollutants.

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From our Newsroom
EPA seeks to add DINP plasticizer to Toxics Release Inventory

EPA seeks to add DINP plasticizer to toxics list

Proposal comes 20 years after regulators first suggested the additive is a health risk

greenwashing climate change denial

Peter Dykstra: Greenwashing’s medieval age

Old school greenwashers and deniers with staying power.

fracking kids health

PFAS: The latest toxic concern for those near fracking

The “forever chemicals” are used by the oil and gas industry, but a lack of transparency and accountability makes it impossible to know how widespread contamination could be.

Colorado fracking

How Colorado is preventing PFAS contamination from the oil and gas industry

And how other states, including Pennsylvania, could do the same.

PFAS Testing

Investigation: PFAS on our shelves and in our bodies

Testing finds concerning chemicals in everything from sports bras to ketchup, including in brands labeled PFAS-free.

PFAS personal care products

Evidence of PFAS in toilet paper (Yes, toilet paper!)

Testing finds fluorine — an indicator of PFAS — in four brands of toilet paper. However, the levels indicate the chemicals are unlikely added on purpose.