Meg Wilcox

New York City pesticide ban

The pesticide ban movement gains momentum

Cities and counties are increasingly banning toxic pesticides—and some are taking aim at fertilizers. But industry attempts to buck local efforts remain a significant hurdle.

PORTLAND, ME—On an early fall day, the city's downtown Fox Field and Playground is humming. A half dozen young men shoot baskets, and small children scramble over playground structures. The central playing field is wet with dew and shimmers an emerald green in mid-morning light.

Keep reading...Show less
DDT Breast Cancer

Pesticide DDT linked to increased breast cancer risk generations after exposure

A woman's exposure to the pesticide DDT during pregnancy can increase her granddaughter's risk for breast cancer decades later, according to a new study.

Keep reading...Show less
Metalmark biomimicry

From butterfly wings to shrimp claws: Mimicking nature on the nanoscale

BOSTON—Standing at a lab bench, Tanya Shirman eyes her creation: a tiny glass vial filled with an iridescent, sand-like material.

Keep reading...Show less
Kids organic vegetables

Organic diets quickly reduce the amount of glyphosate in people’s bodies

Eating an organic diet rapidly and significantly reduces exposure to glyphosate—the world's most widely-used weed killer, which has been linked to cancer, hormone disruption and other harmful impacts, according to a new study.

Keep reading...Show less
Doctor office devices medicine

The danger of hormone-mimicking chemicals in medical devices and meds

Exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals in medicine and medical devices is grossly underestimated, and physicians have an ethical obligation to talk about these exposures with their patients, according to a new study.

Keep reading...Show less
Victoria Goebel evangelical environmental

Making toxic-free births a Christian issue

Reverend Mitchell Hescox was on Capitol Hill in February, urging members of the House Oversight and Reform Committee not to gut an air pollution rule that protects children from the brain-damaging chemical mercury.

Keep reading...Show less
Researchers hand Michigan officials a tool to remedy environmental injustice. Will they use it?
Delores Leonard of Detroit holding up an air pollution analysis. (Credit: Adam Reinhardt)

Researchers hand Michigan officials a tool to remedy environmental injustice. Will they use it?

For decades, community members living alongside heavy industry in Southwest Detroit's infamous 48217 zip code have pressed state environmental regulators to consider the cumulative burden of their exposure to a toxic stew of air pollutants.

Keep reading...Show less
The uphill battle for communities that ban pesticides
Laura Kelley of Protect Our Cape Cod Aquifer. (Credit: Meg Wilcox)

The uphill battle for communities that ban pesticides

WELLFLEET, Mass.—On a recent moonlit evening, with spring peepers in chorus, a dozen Wellfleet residents gathered inside their town's grey-shingled library for a public information session on the controversial herbicide, glyphosate.

Keep reading...Show less
From our Newsroom
american buffalo

Peter Dykstra: Forgotten history

Early laws that were either the first step in environmental protection or the last straw in Native American genocide.

solar power schools

Solar power at Pennsylvania schools doubled during the pandemic

“If this growth continues, schools could set Pennsylvania up as a clean energy leader and not just the fossil fuels we’re known for.”

obesity

Op-Ed: The medical community is missing a major piece of the obesity puzzle

Health care practitioners and regulators need to address the chemicals in everyday products that are in part spurring the obesity crisis.

PFAS Testing

Investigation: PFAS on our shelves and in our bodies

Testing finds concerning chemicals in everything from sports bras to ketchup, including in brands labeled PFAS-free.

environmental justice

LISTEN: Black histories and visions of urban planning

We need to center "lived experience and desire in a way that our existing frameworks don't allow for."

Stay informed: sign up for Above the Fold
The most consequential news on your health and the planet: delivered to your inbox every morning. (Weekly roundup also available)