Melanie Benesh

PFAS in water

Op-ed: The ghosts in our water

The ongoing struggle to clean up legacy PCBs—40 years after they were banned—foreshadows a looming crisis from PFAS.

Last year, the global chemical giant Bayer agreed to pay $650 million to settle the claims of 2,500 cities, counties, and ports for cleanup of contamination from polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, a notorious group of chlorinated chemicals that have long been linked to cancer and reproductive and immune system harms.

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From our Newsroom
PCB pollution

Most of the world agreed on safe PCB waste disposal. It’s not going great—especially in the US.

Just 13% of countries in the Stockholm Convention have disposed of the toxics according to global environmental standards.

ryan zinke

Peter Dykstra: Low crimes and misdemeanors

Multiple ethical violations used to mean bipartisan disdain. Now you get sent to Congress.

environmental justice

LISTEN: Brenda Trejo Rosas on the social dimensions of health

“We should always be learning and changing.”

air pollution

Air pollution lowers global life expectancy by more than two years: Report

The impact is comparable to smoking, six times higher than HIV/AIDS, and 89 times higher than conflict and terrorism.

PFAS Testing

Investigation: PFAS on our shelves and in our bodies

Testing finds concerning chemicals in everything from sports bras to ketchup, including in brands labeled PFAS-free.

Toxics in epoxy

The hidden, potential cancer-causing, danger in woodworking and art supplies

Researchers say a chemical called BADGE is putting everyone from professional woodworks to weekend craft hobbyists at risk.

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