Quinn McVeigh

2020 wildfires

US wildfires’ increasing toll on wildlife

EHN talked to California vets who cared for wildfire-impacted affected animals in 2020.

In Sept. 2020, a 7-year-old female mountain lion was dehydrated and burnt on the bottom of her paw pads.The pain made it unbearable to walk.

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bees pesticides

Pesticides are becoming increasingly toxic for the world's most important insects

Over the last 25 years, the toxicity of 381 pesticides in the U.S. more than doubled for pollinators and aquatic invertebrates such as crustaceans, mayflies, and dragonflies, according to a new study.

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Tucson Arizona climate change trees

Planting a million trees in the semi-arid desert to combat climate change

Reflecting on her childhood, Tucson, Ariz., Mayor Regina Romero points to her father as the figure who lit an environmentalist fire within her.

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seastars ocean disease

Can marine protected areas reduce marine disease?

For some ocean creatures, infectious disease is growing amid a changing climate.

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Biodegradable straws

‘Forever chemicals’ coat the outer layers of biodegradable straws

John Bowden, an assistant professor at University of Florida's College of Veterinary Medicine, wasn't a fan of paper straws when they first gained popularity.

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tap water contaminants

More than 2 million Americans exposed to high levels of strontium in drinking water

About 2.3 million Americans are exposed to high natural strontium levels in their drinking water, a metal that can harm bone health in children, according to a United States Geological Survey study.

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Sea otters

Algal blooms target sea otter hearts

Within the past decade, those working on the frontlines of marine health have treated an unprecedented number of animals poisoned by harmful algal blooms.

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Pregnant woman

‘Mystery chemicals’ found in pregnant Bay Area women

Forty-two "mystery chemicals" were found in the blood of 30 Bay Area pregnant women, according to a recent study conducted by scientists at University of California, San Francisco.

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From our Newsroom
fracking pennsylvania

Revealed: Nearly 100 potential PFAS-polluted sites in Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia from fracking waste

A new map reveals at least 97 new locations that could have been contaminated by the industry’s use of “forever chemicals”

environmental chemicals obesity

Obesogens: Chemicals that cause weight gain

It's not all diet and exercise.

young scientists

Op-ed: Why academic journals need to embrace youth

We’re tired of hearing leaders say we need creative solutions to climate issues, and then ignoring the creative solutions youth present.

PFAS Testing

Investigation: PFAS on our shelves and in our bodies

Testing finds concerning chemicals in everything from sports bras to ketchup, including in brands labeled PFAS-free.

PFAS testing

Op-ed: Arming doctors with knowledge about PFAS pollution

A new course and report on PFAS-related health effects can empower patients, promote life-saving screening and help tackle the continued devastating health effects of PFAS chemicals.