Yoshira Ornelas Van Horne

laughter

10 environmental research bloopers

Environmental health and justice research is serious business. But when things go sideways in the field, a sense of humor is a must.

As scientists and scholars our work is often polished and thoughtful. Our professional headshots portray a moment in time where we wore our Sunday best (and perhaps applied a filter or two).

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Research Navajo

Keep your Whole Foods gift card. We want systemic change.

Have you ever gone to the doctor's office, had your body poked at, answered invasive questions, only to be told they will contact you if there is an issue?

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public health research

Quédate con tu tarjeta de regalo de Whole Foods. Queremos un cambio sistémico.

¿Alguna vez has ido al consultorio médico, te han tocado el cuerpo, has respondido preguntas invasivas y te han dicho que se pondrán en contacto con contigo si hay algún problema?

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From our Newsroom
environmental justice reporting

We're hiring: Texas Environmental Health Reporter

Want to do journalism with an impact? We want to hear from you.

ethylene oxide f

Cancer-causing emissions in Pittsburgh-area borough prompt meeting with EPA

A medical sterilization facility’s ethylene oxide emissions have created cancer risk greater than 100 in a million for its neighbors.

PFAS pollution

EHN partner featured in Consumer Reports' citizen science feature

Leah Segedie, founder of Mamavation, has taken it upon herself to find out where PFAS chemicals are lurking.

PFAS Testing

Investigation: PFAS on our shelves and in our bodies

Testing finds concerning chemicals in everything from sports bras to ketchup, including in brands labeled PFAS-free.

air pollution

In polluted cities, reducing air pollution could lower cancer rates as much as eliminating smoking would

“Places with high levels of air pollution would still have higher cancer rates even if smoking was eliminated.”