Be proactive, not reactive: Andrea Hindman, PhD.

"There are many more opportunities for prevention than there are cures for disease"

Dr. Hindman grew up in a family with a robust military background. Her weapon of choice? A pipette.


In this engaging video, discover how Dr. Hindman went from learning to drive over a chemical waste site to working as a Science and Technology Policy Fellow supporting the Department of Defense. Fueled her passions for improving human health through environmental health science and molecular biology, discover how Dr. Hindman's work encourages proactiveness.

Andrea Hindman, PhD., American Association for the Advancement of Science Policy Fellow at the Department of Defense

Dr. Hindman is a native of Niagara Falls, New York. She went to the University at Buffalo for her undergraduate studies in biology and chemistry, and received her PhD. in Molecular Biology at The Ohio State University. She conducted postdoctoral research with the non profit research organization Silent Spring Institute and Northeastern University's Social Science Environmental Health Research Institute. Dr. Hindman is currently a Science Policy Fellow supporting the Department of Defense.

Learn more about Dr. Hindman through her LinkedIn here.

Follow her on Twitter: @andrea_hindman

Print Friendly and PDF
SUBSCRIBE TO EHN'S MUST-READ DAILY NEWSLETTER: ABOVE THE FOLD
From our Newsroom

Climate change, chaos, and cannibalism

Forty eight years ago, a sci-fi thriller predicted a future with all three—in the year 2022.

U.S. Steel abandons clean tech plans in Pittsburgh region following damning health study

The company scraps planned Pennsylvania investments and will instead shut down three polluting batteries in 2023. The announcement comes a week after a study shows lower lung function in people living near its Pittsburgh-region facility.

LISTEN: The allure of regenerative agriculture

"Every being is the full expression of themselves."

Fertility & Environmental Justice: A conversation with Shanna Swan and Annie Hoang

"These toxics chemicals are affecting you—not just the polar bears, the insects, and the birds."

Fractured: The body burden of living near fracking

EHN.org scientific investigation finds western Pennsylvania families near fracking are exposed to harmful chemicals, and regulations fail to protect communities' mental, physical, and social health.

Can marine protected areas reduce marine disease?

EHN talked to marine disease experts about the role of increasing ocean protection in combating rising disease rates.

Above The Fold

Daily & Weekly newsletters all free.