Be proactive, not reactive: Andrea Hindman, PhD.

"There are many more opportunities for prevention than there are cures for disease"

Dr. Hindman grew up in a family with a robust military background. Her weapon of choice? A pipette.


In this engaging video, discover how Dr. Hindman went from learning to drive over a chemical waste site to working as a Science and Technology Policy Fellow supporting the Department of Defense. Fueled her passions for improving human health through environmental health science and molecular biology, discover how Dr. Hindman's work encourages proactiveness.

Andrea Hindman, PhD., American Association for the Advancement of Science Policy Fellow at the Department of Defense

Dr. Hindman is a native of Niagara Falls, New York. She went to the University at Buffalo for her undergraduate studies in biology and chemistry, and received her PhD. in Molecular Biology at The Ohio State University. She conducted postdoctoral research with the non profit research organization Silent Spring Institute and Northeastern University's Social Science Environmental Health Research Institute. Dr. Hindman is currently a Science Policy Fellow supporting the Department of Defense.

Learn more about Dr. Hindman through her LinkedIn here.

Follow her on Twitter: @andrea_hindman

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