7 things residents of Clairton, McKeesport, and Elizabeth need to know about the proposed settlement with U.S. Steel

Ignoring your mail over Christmas could mean losing out

Update: Two free legal clinics will be held in Clairton to provide critical information and 1-on-1 time with an attorney for residents who may be included in the proposed settlement.


The clinics, which are being held by Fair Shake, a nonprofit law firm that is not involved in the proposed settlement, will be held at Clairton City Hall (551 Ravensburg Blvd, Clairton, PA 15025) on Thursday, January 9, 2020 from 4pm-8pm and on Saturday, January 11, 2020 from 10am-2pm.

PITTSBURGH — A proposed settlement in a class action lawsuit against U.S. Steel over pollution at the company's Clairton Coke Works plant could benefit some residents of Clairton, Elizabeth, and McKeesport—or it could wind up costing them.

The suit was brought by two Clairton residents who claimed the company's ongoing air pollution problems robbed them of their ability to enjoy their private property because of how frequently the air smelled bad or was unsafe for them to breathe.

Related: Clairton residents on the proposed U.S. Steel class action settlement: "It's not enough."

The tentative settlement will allow around 5,600 households in certain parts of Clairton and surrounding neighborhoods to split a little more than $1 million. Depending on how many households file claims, residents who file a claim might expect to receive around $200-$300. Some people who are eligible for the lawsuit might have good reasons to opt out of it.

Here's what people living in those neighborhoods need to know:


View/download/print this fact sheet as a PDF:

clairton-settlement-fact-sheet (3).pdf


.

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