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WATCH: "The World After Coronavirus"— a conversation with Paul R. Ehrlich

WATCH: "The World After Coronavirus"— a conversation with Paul R. Ehrlich

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The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic will be felt across the planet for a long time.


In a new video series called "The World After Coronavirus," professor Adil Najam of the Boston University Pardee School of Global Studies, is talking to leading experts across the world to explore the challenges and opportunities we will face in our post-coronavirus future.

This month, Najam spoke to Paul R. Ehrlich, professor emeritus of population studies at Stanford University, about what the pandemic will mean for future population and extinctions dynamics.

"The fact that we have, because of our population size, destroyed the habitats of many other organisms, particularly animals...we have made the conditions much better for things like rodents, which are wonderful carriers of the kinds of disease that transfer to us," Ehrlich says.

Watch the full video above, and check out the full series from the Pardee School of Global Studies.

For more from Paul R. Ehrlich, read his essay, written with his wife Anne, from last month, The fallacy of "back to normal" thinking.

About the author(s):

EHN Staff

Articles written and posted by staff at Environmental Health News

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