Listen into Landscape

LISTEN: Simple experiences in the Everglades

"In order to truly understand and love this place, you have to recognize the beauty in the landscape in the minute details: of the different habitats, the plants, and animals that call it home."

Let's lend our senses to Denise Diaz, Park Ranger at Everglades National Park in Southwest Florida.

Amid the hustle and bustle of an otherwise popular and populated part of the U.S. Southern peninsula, the Everglades sits as a peaceful wetland haven for tropical plants and animals. Denise will share a bit about her own connection to the region and what makes the prairies and grasslands of the Everglades so unique.

This episode is part of the A Listen into Landscape project, a series of audio postcards spotlighting peace, place, and connection to landscape from the perspective of those working in nature.

Natural sound courtesy of Everglades NPS.

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