A chance at healthier lives: Genoa Warner, PhD.

"Our exposures are predetermining the health of future generations"

Genoa's research focuses extensively on endocrine disruption - how chemicals can alter the hormones in our body.


Learn more about her work with the female reproductive system and how chemicals can affect fertility and birth defects.

Genoa Warner, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Comparative Biosciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Genoa Warner is a Postdoctoral Fellow in Endocrine, Developmental, and Reproductive Toxicology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is a passionate environmental health scientist with expertise in the areas of endocrine disruption, female reproduction, toxicology, sustainability, and green chemistry. A chemist by training, Genoa received her BS from Yale University where she did green chemistry research. She earned her PhD from Carnegie Mellon University under the guidance of Professor Terry Collins on the removal of micropollutants from water via oxidative catalysis. During her graduate work, Genoa fell in love with the field of endocrine disruption research and for her postdoc made the jump to Professor Jodi Flaws' lab at Illinois to study the impact of everyday chemicals on female reproduction. Her current research focuses on the metabolism of an environmentally relevant phthalate mixture in ovarian tissue.

Check out Dr. Warner's website for more about her research and publications here.

Follow her on Twitter: @genoawarner

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