A chance at healthier lives: Genoa Warner, PhD.

"Our exposures are predetermining the health of future generations"

Genoa's research focuses extensively on endocrine disruption - how chemicals can alter the hormones in our body.


Learn more about her work with the female reproductive system and how chemicals can affect fertility and birth defects.

Genoa Warner, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Comparative Biosciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Genoa Warner is a Postdoctoral Fellow in Endocrine, Developmental, and Reproductive Toxicology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is a passionate environmental health scientist with expertise in the areas of endocrine disruption, female reproduction, toxicology, sustainability, and green chemistry. A chemist by training, Genoa received her BS from Yale University where she did green chemistry research. She earned her PhD from Carnegie Mellon University under the guidance of Professor Terry Collins on the removal of micropollutants from water via oxidative catalysis. During her graduate work, Genoa fell in love with the field of endocrine disruption research and for her postdoc made the jump to Professor Jodi Flaws' lab at Illinois to study the impact of everyday chemicals on female reproduction. Her current research focuses on the metabolism of an environmentally relevant phthalate mixture in ovarian tissue.

Check out Dr. Warner's website for more about her research and publications here.

Follow her on Twitter: @genoawarner

Print Friendly and PDF
SUBSCRIBE TO EHN'S MUST-READ DAILY NEWSLETTER: ABOVE THE FOLD
From our Newsroom

The dangerous fringe theory behind the push toward herd immunity: Derrick Z. Jackson

Resumption of normal life in the United States under a herd immunity approach would result in an enormous death toll by all estimates.

My urban nature gem

Thanks to the Clean Water Act and one relentless activist, Georgia's South River may finally stop stinking.

Dust from your old furniture likely contains harmful chemicals—but there’s a solution

Researchers find people's exposure to PFAS and certain flame retardants could be significantly reduced by opting for healthier building materials and furniture.

Hormone-mimicking chemicals harm fish now—and their unexposed offspring later

Fish exposed to harmful contaminants can pass on health issues such as reproductive problems to future generations that had no direct exposure.

How Europe’s wood pellet appetite worsens environmental racism in the US South

An expanding wood pellet market in the Southeast has fallen short of climate and job goals—instead bringing air pollution, noise and reduced biodiversity in majority Black communities.

America re-discovers anti-science in its midst

Fauci, Birx, Redfield & Co. are in the middle of a political food fight. They could learn a lot from environmental scientists.

Above The Fold

Daily & Weekly newsletters all free.