Earth Day good news

Good solutions-focused news for Earth Day

We're proud to share three remarkable convergences of news and action we saw this spring.

Great news for Earth Day: We had three major successes this spring. Each shows how one action sparks another – then another.


We're excited by that impact. We hope, as we observe Earth Day this year, that our work inspires you to take a small step that leads toward bigger change.

Fractured: The personal cost of fracking.

Fractured body burden of fracking family

In March we published Fractured, a two-year investigation into pollution spilling from Pennsylvania's fracking fields.

It got noticed:

  • 35 lawmakers sent a note to Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf demanding action.
  • Fracking opponents are using our data in calling for expanded setbacks around drilling operations.
  • Our findings made up 10 percent of the media discussion on fracking, giving it a decided health bent during the month of March.

And community groups are still using Fractured to call for change:

"This is tremendous public health investigation and reporting." – Nina Baird, Carnegie Mellon University

Agents of Change

Agents of Change environmental health environmental justice podcast

Thanks to your support, we welcomed 12 early career scientists from underrepresented backgrounds this spring as our next cohort of Agents of Change.

They're talking and writing bravely about challenges they're addressing in environmental science. The pieces are opening new doors for collaboration, interviews, outreach.

Ask your smart speaker to play "Agents of Change in Environmental Health" on Spotify or check out their essays on EHN.org.

"Too often, society simplifies and labels prematurely, to the detriment of truly comprehensive and effective solutions." – Misbath Daouda, Agents of Change fellow

Small penises, big problem

Count Down infertility

In February noted Mount Sinai researcher and adjunct EHS scientist Dr. Shanna Swan published "Count Down," a look at the environmental causes driving a precipitous decline in fertility worldwide.

The book quickly drew attention: The New York Times, the Washington Post, the Guardian all covered the story. Even the Onion published a "Man on the Street" parody.

"The current state of reproductive affairs can't continue much longer without threatening human survival." – Shanna Swan

Make a difference

Small acts precipitate big change.

And so we have three suggestions for you on this day of action:

1. Share a story. Friends and family in your circle will thank you.

2. Send a note. Take one of our informational guides and send a note to a lawmaker, a county health officer, or your local paper.

3. Donate. Your support helps us keep good science and journalism in the spotlight.

Meet our Interns:

This is the future of journalism and videography. It's bright:

Rowan Gould-Bayba

Rowan comes to us from the Bay Area by way of Oberlin College in Ohio, where he's majoring in videography. Check out his sharp pieces on smarter grocery shopping and the dangers of BPA.

Cameron Oglesby

An ecologist, artist, and Doris Duke Conservation Scholar, Cameron writes insightfully on the intersection of people, planet, place, and justice. She joins us from Duke University, where she's studying environmental science, journalism and media studies.

Quinn Alexander McVeigh

We're always waking Quinn early, as he's in Tucson, Ariz., while we work on East Coast time. A student at the University of Arizona, Quinn writes with vividness and imagination on forest biodiversity, U.S. coastal communities and marginalized populations.

You can support our efforts to prepare early-career journalists for the jobs of tomorrow by donating today.

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From our Newsroom

Climate politics, Pogo edition

Will an old comic strip expression define upcoming global climate talks?

Climate pollution from plastics to outpace coal emissions in US by 2030, report finds

The petrochemical industry has found a new market for fossil fuels: Plastics.

Californians living within miles of oil and gas wells have toxic air

"For many years, communities have been complaining about how oil drilling in their neighborhoods is harmful. Now we have numbers to back that up."

LISTEN: Carlos Gould on global energy poverty and indoor air pollution

"Air pollution affects a number of health outcomes, but for children in particular those impacts are so severe."

Ocean plastic pollution

Too much plastic is ending up in the ocean — and making its way back onto our dinner plates.

Diesel trucks are causing environmental injustice across US cities

Using satellite data, researchers found that poor communities of color are highly exposed to toxic nitrogen dioxide pollution, largely due to diesel truck traffic.

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