Good River: Our reporters want to hear your Ohio River stories and concerns

Text "OHIO" to 765-227-2602 to share with our seven-newsroom collaborative.

Environmental Health News has teamed up with six other news organizations to cover what often seems to be the most underappreciated water asset in the country: the Ohio River.


The Ohio River provides drinking water for five million people, and it's a thoroughfare of business, supporting jobs and communities. But it's also commonly cited as the most polluted river in the United States.

Our project, entitled Good River: Stories of the Ohio, delves into the past, present and future of this watershed region and aims to educate and surprise you at the same time. Our journalism will share with you the beauty of the Ohio River and its watershed (e.g. epic scenery and close-up wildlife) as well as the threats facing it.

You can help our seven-newsroom coalition tell stories that envision a better future for the Ohio.

Introducing Good River texts. Here's how it works:

  • Text "OHIO" to 765-227-2602. (Note that standard message rates apply and you can opt out anytime by texting STOP.)
  • Follow the prompts to introduce yourself to us.
  • Share your story, tip, concern, question or photo with us.
  • We'll text you with questions and information in return. (You can opt out easily if you hit your max on Ohio River knowhow.)

We're excited about this project—and we want to hear from you.

Visit the project homepage for all of the stories and follow the series on Twitter at #OhioRiverStories.

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