Listen into Landscape

LISTEN: Respecting Earth and Indigeneity in the Grand Canyon

"The connection the people have here with the Grand Canyon and the surrounding area is much much deeper than many of the experiences that people have that visit the park. They emerged into this world from the Grand Canyon."

Let's lend our ears to Daniel Pawlak, the Cultural Demonstrator Program Manager at Grand Canyon National Park.

The Grand Canyon is a beautiful, sprawling landscape of mesas and rock formations. But Dan describes a thriving series of desert ecosystems, much more diverse, colorful, and culturally significant than one might think. Dan will take us on a journey through the Grand Canyon as both an ecological marvel and a space of cultural and ancestral significance for the 11 associated tribes in the region.

This episode is part of the A Listen into Landscape project, a series of audio postcards spotlighting peace, place, and connection to landscape from the perspective of those working in nature.

Natural sound from Grand Canyon NPS and Western River Expeditions. Music By Ed Kabotie, member of the Hopi Village of Shungopavi in Arizona and the Tewa Village of Santa Clara in New Mexico.

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