WATCH: John Oliver's take-down of "astroturfing"

Citizens for Fire Safety? American Council on Science and Health? Last Week Tonight host scorches BS front groups

This week John Oliver delivered a hilarious take-down of astroturfing—when front groups take on deliberately misleading names and shill for vested interests.


Among the examples he cites: Citizens for Fire Safety (opposing legislation that would ban dangerous flame retardant chemicals) and the American Council on Science and Health (which Oliver shames as recipients of money from fracking and soda companies, e-cigarettes and chemical manufacturers).

As Oliver reports, with a surge in dark money and eased restrictions on its use, astroturf techniques are becoming more dangerous "and they are not going away."

Oliver's guide to astroturfing will help your sniffer detect the BS more effectively.

And you'll laugh while learning!

Print Friendly and PDF
SUBSCRIBE TO EHN'S MUST-READ DAILY NEWSLETTER: ABOVE THE FOLD
From our Newsroom

And now, everything the country is not talking about ...

And here's at least one thing to do about it all.

The dangerous fringe theory behind the push toward herd immunity: Derrick Z. Jackson

Resumption of normal life in the United States under a herd immunity approach would result in an enormous death toll by all estimates.

My urban nature gem

Thanks to the Clean Water Act and one relentless activist, Georgia's South River may finally stop stinking.

Dust from your old furniture likely contains harmful chemicals—but there’s a solution

Researchers find people's exposure to PFAS and certain flame retardants could be significantly reduced by opting for healthier building materials and furniture.

How Europe’s wood pellet appetite worsens environmental racism in the US South

An expanding wood pellet market in the Southeast has fallen short of climate and job goals—instead bringing air pollution, noise and reduced biodiversity in majority Black communities.

Hormone-mimicking chemicals harm fish now—and their unexposed offspring later

Fish exposed to harmful contaminants can pass on health issues such as reproductive problems to future generations that had no direct exposure.

Above The Fold

Daily & Weekly newsletters all free.