WATCH: John Oliver's take-down of "astroturfing"

Citizens for Fire Safety? American Council on Science and Health? Last Week Tonight host scorches BS front groups

This week John Oliver delivered a hilarious take-down of astroturfing—when front groups take on deliberately misleading names and shill for vested interests.


Among the examples he cites: Citizens for Fire Safety (opposing legislation that would ban dangerous flame retardant chemicals) and the American Council on Science and Health (which Oliver shames as recipients of money from fracking and soda companies, e-cigarettes and chemical manufacturers).

As Oliver reports, with a surge in dark money and eased restrictions on its use, astroturf techniques are becoming more dangerous "and they are not going away."

Oliver's guide to astroturfing will help your sniffer detect the BS more effectively.

And you'll laugh while learning!

Print Friendly and PDF
SUBSCRIBE TO EHN'S MUST-READ DAILY NEWSLETTER: ABOVE THE FOLD
(Credit: Petras Gagilas/flickr)
Originals

Federal tests 'dramatically' undercount BPA and other chemical exposures

Tests used by the federal government to determine how much of the chemical bisphenol A is in people's bodies have "dramatically underestimated" our exposure, according to an analysis published today.

Keep reading... Show less
State test results show that Coraopolis has some of the highest levels of PFAS contamination in its drinking water, though it doesn't exceed the federal advisory level. (Photo via Unsplash)
Originals

Coraopolis drinking water shows PFAS contamination among highest in Pennsylvania, but below federal advisory

Editor's note: This story is part of an ongoing collaboration between Environmental Health News and PublicSource on PFAS contamination in Pennsylvania.
Keep reading... Show less
Illustration of the R.E. Burger power plant by David Wilson/Belt Magazine.
Originals

What the petrochemical buildout along the Ohio River means for regional communities and beyond

The R.E. Burger coal-fired power plant's final day ended, appropriately enough, in a cloud of black smoke and dust.

Keep reading... Show less
BPA testing in the lab of Cheryl Rosenfeld, a University of Missouri researcher. (Credit: Cheryl Rosenfeld)
Originals

Exposed: A scientific stalemate leaves our hormones and health at risk

This is part 1 of a 4-part investigation of the science surrounding the chemical BPA and the U.S. regulatory push to discredit independent evidence of harm while favoring pro-industry science despite significant shortcomings.

Keep reading... Show less
Originals

Fighting pollution and apathy on the Lower Ohio

NEW ALBANY, Ind. — When Jason Flickner was a kid, he built a dam on the creek behind his grandparents' house causing it to flood a neighbor's basement.

Keep reading... Show less
From our Newsroom

Hidden gotcha in artificial turf installations

With heightened awareness around the country about the health effects of PFAS, calculations for what artificial turf installations actually cost over their full life-time may send a shock through the artificial turf industry

Above The Fold

Daily & Weekly newsletters all free.