WATCH: John Oliver's take-down of "astroturfing"

Citizens for Fire Safety? American Council on Science and Health? Last Week Tonight host scorches BS front groups

This week John Oliver delivered a hilarious take-down of astroturfing—when front groups take on deliberately misleading names and shill for vested interests.


Among the examples he cites: Citizens for Fire Safety (opposing legislation that would ban dangerous flame retardant chemicals) and the American Council on Science and Health (which Oliver shames as recipients of money from fracking and soda companies, e-cigarettes and chemical manufacturers).

As Oliver reports, with a surge in dark money and eased restrictions on its use, astroturf techniques are becoming more dangerous "and they are not going away."

Oliver's guide to astroturfing will help your sniffer detect the BS more effectively.

And you'll laugh while learning!

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