Meet our new Pittsburgh reporter

Kristina Marusic will join EHN and cover Western Pennsylvania

We're growing. And we're excited about it.


Kristina Marusic will join EHN as a full-time reporter covering environmental health and justice issues in Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania.

Marusic comes to EHN after years as a freelance journalist covering the environment, LGBT equality, feminism, social justice, activism and politics. Her work has appeared in The Washington Post, Public Source, Slate, Vice, Women's Health, Fusion, MTV News, The Advocate, Logo TV's NewNowNext and Bustle.

She is also the co-founder and chair of the Pittsburgh Association of LGBTQ Journalists (NLGJA).

Marusic will be working with senior editor Brian Bienkowski to cover under-reported environmental health and justice issues in and around Pittsburgh with a mix of daily stories and investigative projects. These stories, while relevant to all residents, will focus on the disproportionate environmental justice impacts that often fall on communities of color and poor neighborhoods.

She will engage directly with readers and the local community to support and bolster our reporting, and will help spearhead EHN's push into diverse methods of storytelling and new platforms.

Why Pittsburgh? For years EHN has covered national science and environmental health issues, filling in gaps we see in mainstream reporting—and we're still going to do that.

By bringing Marusic on board, we also see an opportunity to take that approach and localize it.

There is a wealth of important environmental journalism happening in Western Pennsylvania. We seek to complement those efforts and focus like a laser on the environmental health challenges in the region—as well as on the solutions and opportunities to facilitate a healthier Pittsburgh.

Marusic will start in early March.

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