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On Flies and Humans: Raquel Chamorro-Garcia, PhD.

On Flies and Humans: Raquel Chamorro-Garcia, PhD.

"When I was ten, I never imagined I would do research for a living"

0 min read

An invitation to do a simple experiment sparked Dr. Chamorro-Garcia's fascination with science.


In this video, she tells us about this first experiment and her current work deciphering the ways exposures to environmental pollutants affect current and future generations.

Raquel Chamorro-Garcia, PhD Researcher, University of California Irvine, Dept. of Developmental and Cell Biology

Raquel has always been interested in understanding how the environment contributes to increased human susceptibility to disease. For the last eight years, she has been working in Dr. Blumberg's Lab at the University of California, Irvine, on deciphering the mechanisms by which exposure to certain environmental pollutants during pregnancy contributes to increased predisposition to obesity – not only in the immediate generation but also in subsequent generations that were not directly exposed to the pollutants. She hopes her research can help the scientific community better understand environmental factors contributing to increasing rates of obesity worldwide and reduce the risk of developing obesity-related diseases such as type-2 diabetes. Dr. Charmorro-Garcia obtained her PhD at the Universidad Autónoma of Madrid in Spain.

Follow Dr. Chamorro-Garcia on Twitter: @chamorrogarciar.

Check out her lab, publications, and research here.

About the author(s):

EHN Staff

Articles written and posted by staff at Environmental Health News

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