Print Friendly and PDF
Tackling the difficult questions: Ashley Malin, PhD.

Tackling the difficult questions: Ashley Malin, PhD.

"But in the years following my healing, I kept my promise"

In this video, Dr. Ashley Malin recounts her path to becoming a public health scientist and psychologist, facing a life-altering disease along the way.


Watch to learn how Dr. Malin's determination led to publishing research in an under-studied field, linking low-level sodium fluoride exposure and neurodevelopment.

Ashley Malin, PhD., Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Dr. Malin is a post-doctoral fellow in the Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. She is committed to asking critical public health questions in order to help improve people's health and well-being. Trained as both an environmental health scientist and a psychologist, she approaches these questions with a unique lens. Dr. Malin's current research focuses on examining potential neuro-endocrine effects of fluoride exposure as well as the role of early-life nutrition in nervous system development. She obtained her PhD in clinical psychology at York University in Toronto, Canada.

Read Dr. Malin's study mentioned in the video here.

Follow Dr. Malin on Twitter: @AshleyJMalin

Become a donor
Today's top news

LISTEN: Beau Taylor Morton on the power of community organizing

“People can see you engaged and wanting to begin the work, not only as a researcher, but you’re invested in the community.”

From our newsroom

Op-ed: What the media gets wrong about the new world population numbers

The last time that we lived within the productivity limits of our planet was about 50 years ago — that is a problem.

Pennsylvania’s first proposed hazardous waste landfill would be near homes and schools

Residents can voice their opinions at an upcoming public hearing or in public comments.

Where did the PFAS in your blood come from? These computer models offer clues

New research could help pinpoint “forever chemicals” exposure — giving communities a roadmap for cleanup and individuals direction on what to avoid.

Making an impact with environmental health: Yanelli Nunez, PhD.

Engaging in ways to make scientific work more impactful

Peter Dykstra: Journalists I’m thankful for

My third annual list of the over-achieving and under-thanked.