www.pri.org

Food waste increases during the pandemic - making an old problem worse

Long before COVID-19 disruptions forced dairy farmers to dump millions of gallons of milk into fields and farmers to plow under fields of vegetables, a third of all food produced globally was going to waste, with huge consequences for world hunger and the climate.

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www.reuters.com
Climate

Climate-friendly almond farmers coax life from drying Spanish soil - Reuters

In one of the driest corners of Europe, Manuel Barnes has watched the soil become healthier since he started growing almonds using techniques aimed at bringing new life to the land.
www.nytimes.com
Justice

Hunger program’s slow start leaves millions of children waiting

Child hunger is soaring, but two months after Congress approved billions to replace school meals, only 15 percent of eligible children had received benefits.
Two growers tend to crops on farm in North Philadelphia. (Credit: Sonia Galiber)
Originals

We don't farm because it's trendy; we farm as resistance, for healing and sovereignty

For more than 150 years, from the rural South to northern cities, Black people have used farming to build self-determined communities and resist oppressive structures that tear them down.

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www.reuters.com
Food

New wave of locusts raises fear for summer crops in India

A new wave of locust attacks has alarmed India's farmers and experts warn of extensive crop losses if authorities fail to curb fast-spreading swarms by June when monsoon rains spur rice, cane, corn, cotton and soybean sowing.
www.nytimes.com
Climate

Plant-based ‘meats’ catch on in the pandemic

As the meat industry struggles to respond to the outbreak, makers of vegan substitutes are ramping up production to meet new interest from shoppers.
www.stuff.co.nz
Climate

Taking New Zealand wine carbon neutral to lure younger buyers

New Zealand wine producers, both big and small, are innovating to meet the challenge of making their industry carbon neutral by 2050.
www.newscientist.com
Toxics

Bees force plants to flower early by cutting holes in their leaves

Hungry bumblebees can make plants flower up to a month earlier than usual by cutting holes in their leaves, which may help them adapt to climate change.

civileats.com
Justice

Red Wing United is building power in Laredo, 'the last place to get aid'

Two young organizers have rallied the border town community to meet the needs of the most vulnerable during the pandemic.
Originals

Reevaluating fish consumption advisories during the COVID-19 pandemic: Analysis

Even in the best of times, spring's long days, warming temperatures, greening landscapes, and sunshine represent a time of growth and optimism—a time to open windows, go outdoors, perhaps even try one's hand at gardening or fishing.

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www.earth.com
Climate

Warming seawater will push Antarctic krill farther south

Rising ocean temperatures will alter the distribution and life cycles of Antarctic krill in the coming decades, according to a new study led by the University of Tasmania.

news.mongabay.com
Climate

In South Korea, centuries of farming point to the future for sustainable agriculture

Agriculture in South Korea is a blend of centuries-old traditions and contemporary techniques adapted to a variety of environmental conditions, making it a model to adopt in the effort to future-proof food production against climate change.

www.eveningexpress.co.uk
Climate

What insects eat vital to future of food, says Aberdeen University study

The study has found that much like humans, insects will change their diet to try new things depending on where they are. The discovery, led by Dr Lesley Lancaster, could have a serious impact on crops as global warming causes insects to colonise new regions.

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