www.miamiherald.com

Mercury pollution turns off great egrets when mating

Mercury exposure led to breeding failure in half of great egrets a University of Florida study.

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www.theguardian.com
Biodiversity

More murder hornet nests suspected after first on US soil eradicated

Scientists removed 98 so-called murder hornets from a nest discovered near the Canadian border in Washington state over the weekend, including 13 that were captured live in a net, the state agriculture department said.

Biodiversity

Light pollution may skew mule deer and cougar dynamic

Light pollution in what is home to some of the darkest night skies in the continental US may change the dynamics between mule deer and cougars.
apnews.com
Toxics

Trump environmental rollback spurs mining near Okefenokee

A mining company says it plans to dig for minerals without a federal permit at the edge of the vast wildlife refuge in the Okefenokee Swamp, a big step for a once-embattled project that's now benefiting from the Trump administration's rollback of environmental rules.

www.theguardian.com
Toxics

Doe your bit: Japan invents bags deer can eat after plastic-related deaths

The famed deer that roam the city of Nara, in Japan, no longer face discomfort - or far worse - after local companies developed a safe alternative to the plastic packaging discarded by tourists that often ended up in the animals' stomachs.

www.theguardian.com
Biodiversity

Vast majority of Europe's key habitats in poor or bad condition – report

The vast majority of protected landscapes across Europe are rated as in poor or bad condition and vital species and their habitats continue to decline despite targets aimed at protecting them, according to a report.

www.theguardian.com
Climate

Why there is hope that the world's coral reefs can be saved

From coral farming to 3D printing, scientists are using novel methods to save a vital part of our ecosystem.

www.wired.com
Biodiversity

Wild predators are relying more on our food—and pets

A new study shows that some big carnivores are getting up to half their diet from sources like trash, crops, or small mammals that live near people.
www.theguardian.com
Climate

Rewild to mitigate the climate crisis, urge leading scientists

Restoring natural landscapes damaged by human exploitation can be one of the most effective and cheapest ways to combat the climate crisis while also boosting dwindling wildlife populations, a scientific study finds.

www.nytimes.com
Climate

Restoring farmland could drastically slow extinctions, fight climate change

The twin crises of climate change and biodiversity loss are intertwined: Storms and wildfires are worsening while as many as one million species are at risk of extinction. The solutions are not small or easy, but they exist, scientists say.

www.theguardian.com
Biodiversity

Australia needs a new agency to monitor threatened species, top scientists say

The federal government should establish a new agency similar to the Bureau of Meteorology to observe and make forecasts on the state of Australia's wildlife, according to leading Australian scientists.

www.theguardian.com
Biodiversity

'Heads in the sand': Conservationists condemn US failure to protect wolverines

The US Fish and Wildlife Service has denied protection to wolverines under the Endangered Species Act, frustrating conservation groups who argue the species faces an existential threat from the climate crisis.

www.theguardian.com
Climate

Fifth of countries at risk of ecosystem collapse, analysis finds

One-fifth of the world's countries are at risk of their ecosystems collapsing because of the destruction of wildlife and their habitats, according to an analysis by the insurance firm Swiss Re.

ensia.com
Biodiversity

Reducing the risk that wildlife trade will lead to infectious diseases

As the Covid-19 pandemic decimates tourism, poaching is on the rise in Africa. The search is on for alternative ways to meet communities' basic needs.

apnews.com
Climate

US officials: Climate change not a threat to rare wolverine

U.S. wildlife officials are withdrawing proposed protections for the snow-loving wolverine after determining the rare and elusive predator is not as threatened by climate change as once thought.

From our Newsroom

The dangerous fringe theory behind the push toward herd immunity: Derrick Z. Jackson

Resumption of normal life in the United States under a herd immunity approach would result in an enormous death toll by all estimates.

My urban nature gem

Thanks to the Clean Water Act and one relentless activist, Georgia's South River may finally stop stinking.

Dust from your old furniture likely contains harmful chemicals—but there’s a solution

Researchers find people's exposure to PFAS and certain flame retardants could be significantly reduced by opting for healthier building materials and furniture.

Hormone-mimicking chemicals harm fish now—and their unexposed offspring later

Fish exposed to harmful contaminants can pass on health issues such as reproductive problems to future generations that had no direct exposure.

How Europe’s wood pellet appetite worsens environmental racism in the US South

An expanding wood pellet market in the Southeast has fallen short of climate and job goals—instead bringing air pollution, noise and reduced biodiversity in majority Black communities.

America re-discovers anti-science in its midst

Fauci, Birx, Redfield & Co. are in the middle of a political food fight. They could learn a lot from environmental scientists.

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