Toxic exposures and prenatal development: Miranda Spratlen, PhD.

Toxic exposures and prenatal development: Miranda Spratlen, PhD.

"I was horrified to learn that this place of beauty and joy... had potential hazards lurking within it"

Miranda's research into prenatal environmental exposures has led her to three goals: to learn what we're exposed to, how those exposures affect our lives, and practical tips to avoid those exposures.


In this video, learn about her current research with pregnant women in New York City.

Miranda Jones Spratlen, MHS, PhD, Postdoctoral Research Scientist, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health

Miranda Spratlen is currently a Postdoctoral Research Scientist at Columbia University where she is utilizing two contemporaneous birth cohorts based in New York City to investigate health outcomes resulting from prenatal exposures to the World Trade Center disaster. This work conflates her passion for working with vulnerable populations and evaluating health effects of environmental exposures. Dr. Spratlen conducted her doctoral work at Johns Hopkins University where she focused on another vulnerable population, American Indians. Her doctoral dissertation explored the intricate relationships between arsenic exposure and arsenic metabolism, one carbon metabolism and diabetes related outcomes in this population. Leading up to her doctoral degree, Miranda worked for several years outside academia including in the Occupational Medicine, Epidemiology and Prevention Department at Northwell Health System and at the New York City Department of Environmental Protection.

Follow Dr. Spratlen on Twitter: @mirandaspratlen

SUBSCRIBE TO EHN'S MUST-READ DAILY NEWSLETTER: ABOVE THE FOLD
From our Newsroom
climate change

Peter Dykstra: A year into the Biden Administration, environmental hope is sparse

As President Biden completes his first year in the White House, hopes for dramatic change on climate and environment blow away.

Yoga pants

Investigation finds evidence of PFAS in workout and yoga pants

Testing finds fluorine—an indicator of PFAS—in women’s sportswear from popular brands like Old Navy and Lululemon.

Africa cooking pollution

What do new cookstoves in Ghana and air conditioners in NYC have in common? Energy justice.

Combating energy poverty and energy insecurity are critical elements to achieving environmental health equity for billions worldwide.

lead pollution

LISTEN: Lead pollution and mental health

EHN reporter Kristina Marusic talks with Living on Earth about polluted water and mental health.

Stay informed: sign up for Above the Fold
The most consequential news on your health and the planet: delivered to your inbox every morning. (Weekly roundup also available)