Toxicology and public health: Meghan Rebuli, PhD.

"I've learned that the public can demand change much more quickly than enacting government legislation"

As a third-generation STEM specialist, Meghan's passion lies in toxicology.


In this video, she shares her family's diverse experience in the sciences, her focus on how toxins affect males and females differently, and what she considers her duty to share her work with the public - in order to affect change in public health, quickly.

Meghan E. Rebuli, PhD, Postdoctoral Research Associate, Toxicology and the Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, and Lung Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Meghan E. Rebuli, PhD is a postdoctoral research associate in the Curriculum in Toxicology and the Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, and Lung Biology, at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She is deeply curious about environmental influences on the human innate immune system and is investigating the potential for chemicals in the environment to alter the endocrine and immune systems, disrupting the balance between the two systems, and altering their function. She is currently studying the effects of air pollutants, such as wood smoke, and inhaled tobacco products, like cigarettes and e-cigarettes. Recently, she demonstrated that exposure to e-cigarettes suppresses immune gene expression in the airway even more than cigarette smoke. She has begun to demonstrate that male and female immune systems differ and thus their response to environmental toxicants may occur in opposite directions. Dr. Rebuli earned her bachelor and doctoral degrees from North Carolina State University in Raleigh, NC where she studied the neurodevelopmental and behavioral impacts of Bisphenol A (BPA), an environmental endocrine disruptor present in a variety of consumer products. Dr. Rebuli's research has resulted in multiple publications in high-impact scientific journals and a variety of honors and awards.

Follow Dr. Rebuli on Twitter: @meradfor

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