A growing problem: Water at 45 military bases now contaminated by foam

The U.S. military's firefighting foam problem is growing, with some form of drinking water contamination now found at 37 bases across the country and eight more overseas.


News of the problem has reached the halls of Congress, where Senator Maria Cantwell (D - Wash) put forward a measure that would allocate up to $62 billion to help clean up wells contaminated by the use of firefighting foam. Up to 400 bases may have been affected.

Contamination is not limited to U.S. military bases, with reports of contamination - and controversy - erupting at Australian military facilities as well.

Check out our archives for a comprehensive review of the issue.

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