news.vice.com

Coal miners are dying of black lung.

And a Kentucky law could make it harder to claim benefits.

A black lung epidemic is killing miners younger than ever before; a new Kentucky law could make it harder to claim benefits.


Key quote:

instead of making it easier for miners to get access to health care, Kentucky's lawmakers passed a law that may soon hinder miners' ability to obtain workers' compensation benefits.

Vice is the latest to report on what has become the biggest black lung epidemic in years.

Inside Climate News had a report Thursday by veteran reporter Jim Bruggers alleging that miners were pressured to cover up monitors meant to protect their health.

Popular Science had a piece back in February about the worrisome reversal of decades of health and mine safety improvements. "A greater proportion of miners than before are younger and have worked in mines for less than 20 years," Amal Amed reported, after concluding the rise isn't due to higher reporting rates or better detection.

We've aggregated a bunch of stories about the condition this year. See the whole collection here in our archives.

Read the full Vice News report.

Print Friendly and PDF
SUBSCRIBE TO EHN'S MUST-READ DAILY NEWSLETTER: ABOVE THE FOLD
BarbiAnn Maynard drives 45 minutes from her home in Martin County, Kentucky, to a spring at the Mingo-Logan county line in West Virginia to fill containers with fresh water. (Credit: Curren Sheldon/100 Days in Appalachia)
Originals

'That's vinegar:' The Ohio River's history of contamination and progress made

In 1958, researchers from the University of Louisville and the Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission gathered at a lock on the Monongahela River for routine collecting, counting and comparing of fish species.

Keep reading... Show less
Originals

Clouded in Clarity: A comic on chemicals & controversy

Harmful chemicals are difficult to understand. So, to pair with our investigation, "Exposed" we present EHN's first comic, "Clouded in Clarity," which focuses on BPA and the controversy around an ongoing, massive study on it.

Keep reading... Show less
From our Newsroom

Above The Fold

Daily & Weekly newsletters all free.