Community follow-up to ​​"Fractured": Holding politicians accountable

Community follow-up to ​​"Fractured": Holding politicians accountable

Here's how you can help us make an impact.

We need your help following up with lawmakers about Fractured, Environmental Health News's four-part series documenting harmful chemical exposures among families living near fracking wells in Pennsylvania.


We reached out to Pennsylvania politicians to hear their thoughts on our findings and ask what they're doing to protect Pennsylvania residents, then documented all of their responses.

Below are sample messages for emails, tweets, letters, or phone calls to several groups of policymakers: Those who made public statements about the series or responded to our requests for comment and expressed concern about our findings, those who responded dismissively about our findings, and those who declined to comment or blew us off.

We also strongly encourage you to read the full statements or interviews from the politicians who did take time to respond, and send them a personalized note that specifically addresses the things they said in those statements or interviews.

For policymakers who declined to comment or ignored our requests for comment:

I was disappointed to learn that when Environmental Health News reached out to you for comments on its two-year investigation on fracking and health, you either failed to respond or declined to comment.

The investigation found that Pennsylvania families who live near fracking wells face high levels of exposure to toxic chemicals. I am disappointed you could not be bothered to respond to an issue so important to me. Your failure to comment on the record suggests that the health and wellbeing of Pennsylvania families is not a priority for you—something my community will remember at the polls.

I urge you to take the time to read the report and provide a thoughtful response: How do you plan to use your power as a policymaker to ensure that residents are protected from harmful exposures from the fracking industry?

​For policymakers who signed a public letter to PA Gov. Tom Wolf urging him to take action in response to the study's findings:

Thank you for signing the March 17th letter "RE: Request for Action" to Gov. Tom Wolf. Environmental Health News's two-year study revealed that Pennsylvanians who live near fracking wells face harmful chemical exposures.

I appreciate you speaking out about this important issue, and I hope you'll continue standing up for the health and safety of all Pennsylvanians by incorporating good science into public policy and by supporting measures aimed at protecting residents from potential health harms from fracking.

​For policymakers who expressed concern about EHN's findings that families living near fracking wells are being exposed to harmful chemicals

Thank you for taking the time to speak with Environmental Health News about the results of their two-year investigation on fracking and health.

This issue is very important to me. I appreciate you being open about your position on it, and I hope you'll continue researching this issue, incorporating good science into public policy, and standing up for the health and safety of all Pennsylvanians by supporting measures aimed at protecting residents from potential health harms from fracking.

​For policymakers who dismissed EHN's findings that families living near fracking wells are being exposed to harmful chemicals:

I appreciate that you took the time to respond to Environmental Health News's two-year investigation on fracking and health, but I'm disappointed by your response.

The investigation found that Pennsylvania families who live near fracking wells face high levels of exposure to toxic chemicals. Your response suggests that the health and wellbeing of Pennsylvania families is not a priority for you—something your constituents will remember at the polls.

I urge you to reconsider your position and prioritize good science and the protection of the health and safety of Pennsylvania residents.



Banner photo: Bryan Latkanich and his son Ryan point out hydraulic fracturing equipment near their home in Washington County. Credit: Kristina Marusic for Environmental Health News

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