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Healthy Environment = Healthy People: Fenna Sillé, Ph.D., M.S.

Healthy Environment = Healthy People: Fenna Sillé, Ph.D., M.S.

How the immune systems is affected by environmental factors

As a kid, Fenna declared, "I want to help save people while saving the world". Now a research scientist, she is investigating how our immune system is affected by environmental factors.


Fenna C. M. Sillé, Ph.D., M.S., Assistant Professor in Environmental Health & Engineering, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Dr. Fenna Sillé is an immunologist with a passion for environmental health. As an assistant professor in Environmental Health & Engineering at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, she is researching how early-life exposures change the immune system and increase the risk of respiratory infections and lung cancer later in life. Her lab currently focuses on the effect of arsenic exposure on tuberculosis, influenza and vaccine efficacy – issues that affect millions of people worldwide. Prior to joining Johns Hopkins, Dr. Sillé was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California Berkeley and did her PhD work at the Brigham & Women's Hospital in Boston. She has won numerous awards, including the prestigious K99/R00 Career Development Grant from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.

Explore Dr. Sillé's research here.

Follow her on Twitter: @fsille

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