Major journal sounds alarm over global mass poisoning

Handful of new published papers raises serious issues with chemical regulation

A leading scientific journal—PLOS Biology—has warned that we are all heavily contaminated and chemical regulation is failing us.


We wrote about one of these papers on the dangers of low doses this week.

The signs of this global mass poisoning are all around us as we live in an era of chronic non-communicable diseases that arise when the endocrine system malfunctions.

Endocrine disrupting chemicals are hacking our hormone system, which must function properly at the right time and the right place to guide growth and development.

This hacking can take place at astonishingly low levels that are commonly experienced by people, but chemical safety testing by public health agencies rarely if ever examines.

And the disruption of hormones contributes to the dramatic rise we have experienced around the world of diseases and disabilities like breast and prostate cancer, diabetes, autism, infertility, immune dysfunction and many others.

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