22 endocrinologists on what products they use in their homes

Plastic in the microwave? Scented candles? Drinking tap water? Learn what the experts use in their own lives.

Deciding what household products and foods to buy is tricky.


There are thousands of products out there. Many do the exact same thing, or are nearly identical with slight nuance. But some products contain toxic compounds that can harm us or our children. Even the simple task of choosing a toothpaste can give us anxiety!

While this isn't the definitive Guide to Every Item You Should Ever Purchase (check out what our friends at EWG and Mamavation have compiled if you need that!), we sent a survey to 22 endocrinologists asking what they use in their homes.

These scientists know what ingredients are harmful to your health, and give some important pointers on things to avoid as you do your shopping.

Explore their answers to questions such as "do you buy organic produce?" and "do you buy scented products?" below.

Take what you learn as an opportunity to narrow down some of the choices out there.

Banner photo credit: whologwhy/flickr

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