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pete myers

LISTEN: Medical plastic may interfere with breast cancer treatment

"We have to get people demanding that research be supported and demanding to the hospitals that they push to have the replacements available as quickly as possible."

Pete Myers, the founder and chief scientist of Environmental Health Sciences, visitsLiving on Earthto discuss a new study that found DEHP, a phthalate chemical used in plastic hospital intravenous bags and medical tubing, may interfere with breast cancer treatment.


"We've got to systematically rethink, which of those plastics are important? How can we redesign the ones that are important so that they don't cause endocrine disrupting problems?" Myers said. "And thirdly, we have to think about having the FDA [Food and Drug Administration] reform the way that it regulates endocrine disrupting compounds throughout society. It's not doing its job."

Listen to the interview below or visit Living on Earth.

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