Benoit Rivard

10-31: Huge climate, health report; African invaders

Our health, economy is already suffering from a changing climate, according to new Lancet report

Happy Halloween! Top news for Tuesday, Oct. 31: Our climate, our health; Feeding Africa prompts invaders


1. Today's top read: Record carbon, migrants, hampered health

The Lancet journal released its latest report tracking climate change impacts to public health. The report comes from researchers at 26 institutions around the world and found the level of CO2 in the atmosphere made a record jump in 2016, to hit a concentration not seen for more than 3 million years.

  • 2007 to 2016 averaged 306 weather-related disasters per year, a 46 percent increase since 2000.
  • At least 4,400 people have been forced to migrate worldwide because of climate change.
  • From 2000 to 2016, increasing temperatures led to an estimated 5.3 percent drop in work productivity for people doing manual labor.

Full coverage:

Climate change already damaging health of millions globally, report finds. Heatwaves, pollution and disease are the main health issues linked to global warming but action to halt emissions would deliver huge benefits. (Source: Guardian)

Climate change is already a public health crisis, top medical journal says. Heatwaves, disease-carrying insects and prolonged allergies are some of the early symptoms noted in a major new report. (Source: HuffPo)

Jeff Nesbit: Climate change is bad for your health.
This is now a medical and public health fight, not just an environmental one. (Source: NY Times)

Related:

2. Invaders and saving deltas

As Africa has pushed aquaculture to feed a growing population, it could be spreading invasives and hurting native fish, reports Yale Environment360.

"The idea of supporting the poorest of the poor is so compelling that the outcomes were often ignored," says Peter Britz, an aquaculture expert at South Africa's Rhodes University. Aquaculture now threatens African treasures such as Lake Malawi, Okavango Delta and the Zambezi River.

See the full story: How aquaculture is threatening the native fish species of Africa

Related:

Inside the mission to save Africa's Okavango Delta (Source: National Geographic)

The largest ever tropical reforestation is planting 73 million trees (Source: Fast Company)

3. Fed watch

In unprecedented move, EPA to block scientists who get agency funding from serving as advisers. Scott Pruitt is poised to make wholesale changes to the agency's key advisory group by jettisoning scientists who have received grants from the EPA and replacing them with industry experts and state government officials. (Source: Washington Post)

Trump's gang of climate deniers has grown into an army
He keeps picking deniers for top government positions (Source: New Republic)

5. When life gives you water bottles ...

Artist Mel Chin is spearheading the Flint Fit project—taking water bottles from the Flint and turning them into raincoats, swimwear and other clothes. "The possibilities of hope and renewal occur here," Chin said.

MLive has the story: Artist, fashion designer to make water bottles from Flint into clothing

See the project page here: Mel Chin: All Over The Place

6. New science

  1. Bacteria can evolve resistance to drugs before those drugs are used. A new study turns the history of MRSA on its head. (Source: The Atlantic)
  2. Pesticide residues linked to unsuccessful IVF. Women who ate more produce known to harbor pesticides were less likely to succeed with fertility treatment than women who ate fewer of these fruits and vegetables. (Source: The Scientist)
  3. Plastic bottles, toothbrushes, chip bags make up huge floating garbage site in Caribbean. Just off the Caribbean island of Roatan lies a massive pile of floating garbage. (ABC News)

Print Friendly and PDF
SUBSCRIBE TO EHN'S MUST-READ DAILY NEWSLETTER: ABOVE THE FOLD
Researcher Pat Hunt with lab mice in her Washington State University lab. (Credit: Lynne Peeples)
Originals

Exposed: Deciphering the real message about BPA

This is part 3 of a 4-part investigation of the science surrounding the chemical BPA and the U.S. regulatory push to discredit independent evidence of harm while favoring pro-industry science despite significant shortcomings.

Keep reading... Show less
Originals

Clouded in Clarity: A comic on chemicals & controversy

Harmful chemicals are difficult to understand. So, to pair with our investigation, "Exposed" we present EHN's first comic, "Clouded in Clarity," which focuses on BPA and the controversy around an ongoing, massive study on it.

Keep reading... Show less
A barge ships coal up the Ohio River near Cincinnati. (Photo by Lucia Walinchus/Eye on Ohio, the Ohio Center for Investigative Journalism)
Originals

The water is cleaner but the politics are messier: A look back at the Clean Water Act movement after 50 years

In June 1969, a Time Magazine article garnered national attention when it brought to light the water quality conditions in Ohio: a river had literally caught fire.

Keep reading... Show less
Originals

Paddling 300 miles to protect the waters of Ohi:yo', the 'good river'

For degawëno:da's, paddling the length of the Allegheny River over the course of four months this year was to be a "witness to the raw element of the natural world."

Keep reading... Show less
BarbiAnn Maynard drives 45 minutes from her home in Martin County, Kentucky, to a spring at the Mingo-Logan county line in West Virginia to fill containers with fresh water. (Credit: Curren Sheldon/100 Days in Appalachia)
Originals

'That's vinegar:' The Ohio River's history of contamination and progress made

In 1958, researchers from the University of Louisville and the Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission gathered at a lock on the Monongahela River for routine collecting, counting and comparing of fish species.

Keep reading... Show less
From our Newsroom

Above The Fold

Daily & Weekly newsletters all free.