WATCH: A global fertility crisis

"Reproduction is a basic human right ... to have that taken away from you from causes that are not within your control is what I'm most concerned about."

Dr. Shanna H. Swan, one of the world's leading environmental and reproductive epidemiologists, teamed up with animation specialists, After Skool, to outline the impact of environmental exposures on men's and women's reproductive health.


Swan, a professor of environmental medicine and public health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City and adjunct scientist at Environmental Health Sciences (publisher of EHN), discusses how this rise in infertility cannot be explained simply by genetics, but is, in part, resulting from exposure to "hormone hackers"—compounds known as endocrine-disrupting chemicals—found in everyday plastics and other products throughout the world.

Last year Swan released a groundbreaking book Count Down: How Our Modern World Is Threatening Sperm Counts, Altering Male and Female Reproductive Development, and Imperiling the Future of the Human Race.

Check out the video above, and visit After Skool's Youtube page for other cool animations.

SUBSCRIBE TO EHN'S MUST-READ DAILY NEWSLETTER: ABOVE THE FOLD
Support good science journalism
From our Newsroom
ski wax PFAS

Workers exposed to PFAS in a variety of industries

From construction to skiing, PFAS are an important, but understudied, source of on-the-job chemical exposure.

1872 mining law

Peter Dykstra: The steal of the last century and a half

The General Mining Law of 1872 turned 150 this month. It hasn’t changed a bit.

environmental justice

Op-Ed: Black gold and the color line

How historical racist redlining practices are linked to higher exposures to oil and gas wells.

Words of wisdom from three leaders in the environmental health and justice field

Words of wisdom from three leaders in the environmental health and justice field

A Q&A with Black and Latina researchers about health equity research and career advice for early career scientists.

PFAS Testing

Investigation: PFAS on our shelves and in our bodies

Testing finds concerning chemicals in everything from sports bras to ketchup, including in brands labeled PFAS-free.

Our mothers' gifts: Readers respond

Our mothers' gifts: Readers respond

We asked you to share one "big lesson" from your mother. And you responded

Stay informed: sign up for Above the Fold
The most consequential news on your health and the planet: delivered to your inbox every morning. (Weekly roundup also available)