Credit: iStock

PFAS in Pennsylvania

Perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances are increasingly found in water supplies throughout the United States.


The class of chemicals, known as PFAS, includes more than 4,000 individual chemicals with similar properties. PFAS don't readily break down once they're in the environment or human bodies, so they can accumulate in animal and human tissues.

The compounds, used in products such as stain- and water-resistant clothing, nonstick pots and pans, firefighting foam, carpets and furniture, are linked to health effects including testicular and kidney cancers, decreased birth weights, thyroid disease, decreased sperm quality, high cholesterol, pregnancy-induced hypertension, asthma and ulcerative colitis.

In Pennsylvania, there are 20 known contaminated sites, including at least two in Southwestern Pennsylvania.

The stories below are part of an ongoing collaboration between Environmental Health News and PublicSource tracking the impacts of PFAS contamination in Pennsylvania and efforts to clean up the chemicals.


Print Friendly and PDF
SUBSCRIBE TO EHN'S MUST-READ DAILY NEWSLETTER: ABOVE THE FOLD
Photo by Oliver Morrison/PublicSource
Originals

Pittsburgh's Neville Island residents could have been drinking PFAS-contaminated water for a month, township officials say

Editor's note: This story was originally published by PublicSource and is part of an ongoing collaboration between Environmental Health News and PublicSource on PFAS contamination in Pennsylvania.

Keep reading... Show less
Children

EHN reporter: Here's how Pittsburgh journalists should cover the LGBTQ+ community

On Wednesday, November 20, EHN's Pittsburgh reporter Kristina Marusic will speak at an event aimed at helping journalists appropriately cover the LGBTQ+ community in Pittsburgh and beyond.

Keep reading... Show less
Charles Koch in 2016. (Credit: Fortune Brainstorm Tech/flickr)
Originals

Peter Dykstra: Clearing up some myths about the seven—yes, seven—Koch Brothers

Among liberals and environmentalists, the name "Koch Brothers" has become a synonym for the bankrolling of the purge of sound climate science and environmental policy in our government.

Keep reading... Show less
Rachel Filippini, GASP's executive director, leads the press conference. (Credit: GASP via Facebook)
Originals

Pittsburgh residents petition officials—again—to take action on rotten-smelling air

PITTSBURGH—Do you smell that?

Keep reading... Show less
From our Newsroom

Above The Fold

Daily & Weekly newsletters all free.