YouTube/Seneca Media and Communications Center

Watch: Seneca Nation celebrates after fracking water treatment permits are revoked

"Instead of feeling tears of frustration, I'm here with tears of joy."

The Seneca Nation of Indians have declared victory after a proposed project to treat fracking wastewater at the headwaters of the Allegheny River was nixed by the local water authority. EHN previously reported on the widespread opposition to the project.


On Monday night, the Coudersport Area Municipal Authority voted unanimously to terminate its relationship with Pittsburgh-based startup Epiphany Water Solutions, LLC. Epiphany's proposed facility would have treated up to 42,000 gallons of fracking wastewater per day, which the municipal authority had previously agreed to discharge into the Allegheny River through their sewage treatment plant.

Members of the Seneca Nation of Indians who attended the meeting cheered after the vote.

"Instead of feeling tears of frustration, I'm here with tears of joy," one member of the Seneca Nation can be seen telling board members of the municipal authority following the vote in a YouTube video posted by the Seneca Nation (below). "I'm 70. I'm a mother. I care for the future of our generations... You all did a great thing today."


Print Friendly and PDF
SUBSCRIBE TO EHN'S MUST-READ DAILY NEWSLETTER: ABOVE THE FOLD
From our Newsroom

Breast cancer: Hundreds of chemicals identified as potential risk factors

Researchers find nearly 300 chemicals linked to breast cancer-contributing hormones in everyday products, and call for a renewed focus on women's exposure risks.

A toxic travelogue

The first four stops on a tour tracing American history through its pollution.

My island does not want to be resilient. We want a reclamation.

Unlearning academic jargon to understand and amplify beauty and power in Puerto Rico.

Measuring Houston’s environmental injustice from space

Satellites show communities of color are far more exposed to pollution in Houston, offering a potential new way to close data gaps and tackle disparities.

Fractured: The body burden of living near fracking

EHN.org scientific investigation finds western Pennsylvania families near fracking are exposed to harmful chemicals, and regulations fail to protect communities' mental, physical, and social health.

The real story behind PFAS and Congress’ effort to clean up contamination: Op-ed

Former EPA official Jim Jones sets the record straight on 'the forever chemical' as lawmakers take up the PFAS Action Act

Above The Fold

Daily & Weekly newsletters all free.