Print Friendly and PDF
Watch: Seneca Nation celebrates after fracking water treatment permits are revoked
YouTube/Seneca Media and Communications Center

Watch: Seneca Nation celebrates after fracking water treatment permits are revoked

"Instead of feeling tears of frustration, I'm here with tears of joy."

The Seneca Nation of Indians have declared victory after a proposed project to treat fracking wastewater at the headwaters of the Allegheny River was nixed by the local water authority. EHN previously reported on the widespread opposition to the project.


On Monday night, the Coudersport Area Municipal Authority voted unanimously to terminate its relationship with Pittsburgh-based startup Epiphany Water Solutions, LLC. Epiphany's proposed facility would have treated up to 42,000 gallons of fracking wastewater per day, which the municipal authority had previously agreed to discharge into the Allegheny River through their sewage treatment plant.

Members of the Seneca Nation of Indians who attended the meeting cheered after the vote.

"Instead of feeling tears of frustration, I'm here with tears of joy," one member of the Seneca Nation can be seen telling board members of the municipal authority following the vote in a YouTube video posted by the Seneca Nation (below). "I'm 70. I'm a mother. I care for the future of our generations... You all did a great thing today."


Become a donor
Today's top news
From our newsroom

What will it take to give babies a phthalate-free start in the world?

It is currently impossible to have a completely phthalate-free neonatal intensive care unit in the U.S. Health experts say that needs to change.

WATCH: Pete Myers and Tyrone Hayes reflect on tremendous progress in the environmental health field

"It isn't one scientific finding that accomplishes a structural change in science. It's a drumbeat — one after the other — for decades."

What happens if the largest owner of oil and gas wells in the US goes bankrupt?

Diversified Energy’s liabilities exceed its assets, according to a new report, sparking concerns about whether taxpayers will wind up paying to plug its 70,000 wells.

LISTEN: Gabriel Gadsden on the rodent infestation and energy justice connection

“What it really comes down to is political will and resource allocation.”

Listen: EHN reporter discusses EPA's new proposed air pollution limits

Kristina Marusic joined Pittsburgh's NPR news station to discuss the proposed new rules