Watch: Seneca Nation celebrates after fracking water treatment permits are revoked
YouTube/Seneca Media and Communications Center

Watch: Seneca Nation celebrates after fracking water treatment permits are revoked

"Instead of feeling tears of frustration, I'm here with tears of joy."

The Seneca Nation of Indians have declared victory after a proposed project to treat fracking wastewater at the headwaters of the Allegheny River was nixed by the local water authority. EHN previously reported on the widespread opposition to the project.


On Monday night, the Coudersport Area Municipal Authority voted unanimously to terminate its relationship with Pittsburgh-based startup Epiphany Water Solutions, LLC. Epiphany's proposed facility would have treated up to 42,000 gallons of fracking wastewater per day, which the municipal authority had previously agreed to discharge into the Allegheny River through their sewage treatment plant.

Members of the Seneca Nation of Indians who attended the meeting cheered after the vote.

"Instead of feeling tears of frustration, I'm here with tears of joy," one member of the Seneca Nation can be seen telling board members of the municipal authority following the vote in a YouTube video posted by the Seneca Nation (below). "I'm 70. I'm a mother. I care for the future of our generations... You all did a great thing today."


SUBSCRIBE TO EHN'S MUST-READ DAILY NEWSLETTER: ABOVE THE FOLD
Support good science journalism
From our Newsroom
environmental justice

LISTEN: Black histories and visions of urban planning

We need to center "lived experience and desire in a way that our existing frameworks don't allow for."

ski wax PFAS

Workers exposed to PFAS in a variety of industries

From construction to skiing, PFAS are an important, but understudied, source of on-the-job chemical exposure.

1872 mining law

Peter Dykstra: The steal of the last century and a half

The General Mining Law of 1872 turned 150 this month. It hasn’t changed a bit.

environmental justice

Op-Ed: Black gold and the color line

How historical racist redlining practices are linked to higher exposures to oil and gas wells.

PFAS Testing

Investigation: PFAS on our shelves and in our bodies

Testing finds concerning chemicals in everything from sports bras to ketchup, including in brands labeled PFAS-free.

Words of wisdom from three leaders in the environmental health and justice field

Words of wisdom from three leaders in the environmental health and justice field

A Q&A with Black and Latina researchers about health equity research and career advice for early career scientists.

Stay informed: sign up for Above the Fold
The most consequential news on your health and the planet: delivered to your inbox every morning. (Weekly roundup also available)