YouTube/Seneca Media and Communications Center

Watch: Seneca Nation celebrates after fracking water treatment permits are revoked

"Instead of feeling tears of frustration, I'm here with tears of joy."

The Seneca Nation of Indians have declared victory after a proposed project to treat fracking wastewater at the headwaters of the Allegheny River was nixed by the local water authority. EHN previously reported on the widespread opposition to the project.


On Monday night, the Coudersport Area Municipal Authority voted unanimously to terminate its relationship with Pittsburgh-based startup Epiphany Water Solutions, LLC. Epiphany's proposed facility would have treated up to 42,000 gallons of fracking wastewater per day, which the municipal authority had previously agreed to discharge into the Allegheny River through their sewage treatment plant.

Members of the Seneca Nation of Indians who attended the meeting cheered after the vote.

"Instead of feeling tears of frustration, I'm here with tears of joy," one member of the Seneca Nation can be seen telling board members of the municipal authority following the vote in a YouTube video posted by the Seneca Nation (below). "I'm 70. I'm a mother. I care for the future of our generations... You all did a great thing today."


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