LISTEN: The howls and huffs of our first National Park

"There's just so much here. It's so large, so diverse. You're constantly experiencing new things."

Let's take a listen into Yellowstone National Park, the oldest and one of the most idyllic public spaces available to the American public.


Today we speak with longtime park ranger Beth Taylor, who dives into her journey as a park ranger, and what the diverse landscapes of Yellowstone mean to her as someone dedicated to environmental education and conservation.

This episode is part of the A Listen into Landscape project, a series of audio postcards spotlighting peace, place, and connection to landscape from the perspective of those working in nature.

Environmental Health News · The howls and huffs of our first National Park. Natural sounds provided by the National Park Service.

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