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10-28: Bill Nye's optimism, cherish winter

As winter erodes, the 'Science Guy' is hopeful science will soon return to public policy. Let's hope he's right.

Top news for Saturday, Oct. 28: Environmental philanthropy, Antarctic glacial melt, and more


Carmaker focuses on oceans, marine resilience

"The Honda Marine Science Foundation formed in 2016 and went public this year, with a mission to "help restore marine ecosystems and facilitate climate change resilience," Inside Philanthropy reports.

The foundation expects to make two to three grants per year of between $25,000 and $75,000.

Takeaway: "An interesting move for Honda, signaling that this is going to become a signature topic for the corporation."

Read the full story here.

What happens when two glaciers collapse?

In Antarctica, you could release enough ice to raise sea levels four feet.

That scenario is underway now with the Pine Island and Thwaites glaciers.

New York Times has breath-taking time-lapse photos. Share this with your kids.

Cherish winter

Associated Press' Seth Borenstein has a look at why Jack Frost seems to be arriving later each fall.

PS, it's not a conspiracy.

Concord Monitor has the story.

Bill Nye's science optimism

Hard to be an optimist in this Twitter-fueled age about science driving policy.

But Bill Nye is. Ecowatch checks in with him on why he's bullish on the future.

Key quote: "As what I hope is the last gasp of the anti-science movement, we have this extraordinary administration with extraordinary people heading up the Department of Education and Environmental Protection Agency."

"But that's going to pass."

Sandy5: Five years after Hurricane Sandy

Five years after Hurricane Sandy swept over New York and New Jersey, many are still coping with aftershocks.

NYT, of course, is on the story: On Staten Island, haunting memories of those killed by Hurricane Sandy

But check out the #Sandy5 coverage on Twitter. Props for one of the best slogans ever: Rise Together.

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Today's top news

What will it take to give babies a phthalate-free start in the world?

It is currently impossible to have a completely phthalate-free neonatal intensive care unit in the U.S. Health experts say that needs to change.

From our newsroom

WATCH: Pete Myers and Tyrone Hayes reflect on tremendous progress in the environmental health field

"It isn't one scientific finding that accomplishes a structural change in science. It's a drumbeat — one after the other — for decades."

What happens if the largest owner of oil and gas wells in the US goes bankrupt?

Diversified Energy’s liabilities exceed its assets, according to a new report, sparking concerns about whether taxpayers will wind up paying to plug its 70,000 wells.

LISTEN: Gabriel Gadsden on the rodent infestation and energy justice connection

“What it really comes down to is political will and resource allocation.”

Listen: EHN reporter discusses EPA's new proposed air pollution limits

Kristina Marusic joined Pittsburgh's NPR news station to discuss the proposed new rules

Racist beauty standards leave communities of color more exposed to harmful chemicals: NYC study

"How do you change centuries of colonialism and racism that have always uplifted light and white skin tone and features?”