WATCH: Investigative reporter talks about Bayer/Monsanto's efforts to discredit her work

"I really was just doing my job as a journalist."

Investigative reporter Carey Gillam sat down with nonprofit newsroom The Real News Network to discuss recent reporting on how Bayer/Monsanto attempted to discredit her reporting on the weedkiller glyphosate— the active ingredient in Roundup.


The interview comes on the heels of Gillam's piece in The Guardian last week, I'm a journalist. Monsanto built a step-by-step strategy to destroy my reputation, that outlined how Monsanto had an action plan specifically to discredit her reporting and her award-winning book, Whitewash: The Story of a Weed Killer, Cancer, and the Corruption of Science.

"This campaign by Monsanto against me has been going on for a long time ... well more than a decade certainly," Gillam says in the Real News Network interview.

"And I really was just doing my job as a journalist. I was reporting on the new scientific evidence that was coming out about different risks—cancer risks and other health risks—associated with Monsanto's herbicides."

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