Top news in BPA
The US Food and Drug Administration hasn't regulated the 10,000 chemicals added to your food, according to a petition filed Wednesday by groups representing pediatricians, the environment, public health, as well as food and consumer safety advocates.

Mary Beth Kirkham hadn't studied microplastics when she was invited to co-edit a new book about microplastics in the environment—but something stood out to her about the existing research.

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The chemical BPA, found in the lining of canned foods and many plastics and in thermal receipts, was linked to a 49% greater risk of death within 10 years, according to a new study.
We know we’re ingesting plastic every day. But what happens to it is still a mystery. Scientists are now trying to figure out how much is staying in our organs, and what the long-term health effects might be.

Girls have been entering puberty at increasingly younger average ages since the 1800s, in no small part because health and nutrition have improved over time. A new experimental study of mice exposed to low doses of BPA indicates EDCs may also contribute.

A new prospective longitudinal study published in Environmental Health Perspectives, that BPA and its substitute, BPS, adds to the evidence tying these endocrine disrupting chemicals to diabetes.

Synthetic chemicals aren't good for you. Examples of how endocrine-disrupting chemicals in plastics, pesticides and other US products impact health have doubled in the last five years, and now include obesity, breast cancer, diabetes and more.

A revolutionary group of scientists are challenging a 500-year-old paradigm that guides how regulators evaluate chemicals.

Exposure to minuscule amounts of bisphenol-A can cause a multitude of health problems, including effects on the developing brain, heart, and ovaries, according to a paper published on Thursday that integrates data from several animal studies.

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An article written by a group of 19 toxicologists has been published verbatim in eight toxicology journals in the last four months.

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Exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals in medicine and medical devices is grossly underestimated, and physicians have an ethical obligation to talk about these exposures with their patients, according to a new study.

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More than 50 different chemicals are now pumped into consumer products in place of BPA. These BPA-free alternatives can be as bad as — or worse than — the original.

It's an uncomfortable, often embarrassing problem—having to pee a lot, but not getting relief when you go.

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Organization and consumer demand for products that don't harm people or pollute the environment are moving forward-thinking brands toward safer ingredients.

We all consume thousands of microplastic particles in food, water, and air, and plastic use can expose us to harmful chemicals. Consumer Reports explains how to eat less plastic and try to reduce your risk.

What affects how likely you are to die from the novel coronavirus?

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Endocrine-disrupting chemicals masquerade as hormones. These insidious contaminants increase the diseases that cause the underlying conditions that result in susceptibility to COVID-19.

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While the plastics crisis has largely played out on the administrative level in the U.S., burdening local governments with the growing costs and logistics of managing plastic garbage, in developing countries that have no government-funded waste collection or recycling systems, those burdens fall on individuals.

From cell phones to bicycle helmets to IV bags, plastic has molded society in ways that make life easier and safer. But the synthetic material also has left harmful imprints on the environment and perhaps human health.

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A fight is brewing over just how polluted our bodies are by BPA, the plastic additive found in everything from canned food to thermal paper receipts and water bottles.

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Bisphenol A and its substitute chemicals—pervasive in food and beverage containers, canned goods and store receipts—are showing up in mothers' wombs at "unexpectedly high levels," according to a new study published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

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The chemical BPA, an endocrine disruptor, is widely used in food packaging. Environmental Health News published a reported series showing that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has stacked the deck against findings from independent scientists that link BPA to harmful human health effects, ranging from birth defects to cancer. Science journalist Lynne Peeples joins Host Steve Curwood to discuss this investigation and why even BPA alternatives may also not be safe.

Sometimes plastic recycling is so much worse than just letting trash be trash.

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Paul Thacker: I once thought these scientists were being paranoid. Then I learned about the tobacco, pesticide, and climate disinformation industry targeting their research and reputations.

Congresswoman Grace Meng (D-NY) was pregnant with her second child when she became concerned about the toxic chemicals that she and her kids — and nearly all of us — encounter every day.

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We all want to live longer, healthier lives. We wish this, not only for ourselves, but for our children and grandchildren, too.

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I'm the founder and chief scientist of Environmental Health Sciences, a nonprofit launched in Charlottesville, Virginia, that publishes Environmental Health News and engages in scientific research and outreach to help the public and policy makers understand that we have many opportunities to prevent diseases and disabilities that are afflicting our families, friends and neighbors today.

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Tests used by the federal government to determine how much of the chemical bisphenol A is in people's bodies have "dramatically underestimated" our exposure, according to an analysis published today.

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We all are exposed daily to bisphenol-A (BPA) and other bisphenols – estrogen-like substances added to food can liners, paper receipts and plastic containers.

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This is part 1 of a 4-part investigation of the science surrounding the chemical BPA and the U.S. regulatory push to discredit independent evidence of harm while favoring pro-industry science despite significant shortcomings.

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Harmful chemicals are difficult to understand. So, to pair with our investigation, "Exposed" we present EHN's first comic, "Clouded in Clarity," which focuses on BPA and the controversy around an ongoing, massive study on it.

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This is part 2 of a 4-part investigation of the science surrounding the chemical BPA and the U.S. regulatory push to discredit independent evidence of harm while favoring pro-industry science despite significant shortcomings.

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This is part 3 of a 4-part investigation of the science surrounding the chemical BPA and the U.S. regulatory push to discredit independent evidence of harm while favoring pro-industry science despite significant shortcomings.

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This is part 4 of a 4-part investigation of the science surrounding the chemical BPA and the U.S. regulatory push to discredit independent evidence of harm while favoring pro-industry science despite significant shortcomings.

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Props, costumes and a Jimmy Kimmel joke weren't enough to prevent the California Senate from trashing a bill Friday that would have restricted retailers from routinely handing out unwanted and unusually long receipts.