LISTEN: EHN's Pittsburgh reporter discusses air pollution from U.S. Steel's Clairton Coke Works

PITTSBURGH—EHN's Pittsburgh reporter Kristina Marusic joined Allegheny Front's Kara Holsopple to talk about U.S. Steel's Clairton Coke Works, one of the biggest emitters of air pollution in Pennsylvania.


The facility, which converts coal into coke for use in steelmaking, has a long history of violating clean air laws and sickening residents of the surrounding neighborhoods in the Mon Valley, a cluster of townships along the Monongahela River 20 miles south of Pittsburgh. This Christmas, Mon Valley endured some of the stinkiest and most polluted air in the nation due to a combination of U.S. Steel's emissions and unusual weather patterns.

During the radio segment, Marusic discussed the ongoing air pollution issues, how climate change is making temperature inversions and "super pollution events" like these more common, and the details of a pending settlement agreement between U.S. Steel and local residents. Read the transcript or listen here.

Print Friendly and PDF
SUBSCRIBE TO EHN'S MUST-READ DAILY NEWSLETTER: ABOVE THE FOLD
From our Newsroom

Hormone-mimicking chemicals harm fish now—and their unexposed offspring later

Fish exposed to harmful contaminants can pass on health issues such as reproductive problems to future generations that had no direct exposure.

America re-discovers anti-science in its midst

Fauci, Birx, Redfield & Co. are in the middle of a political food fight. They could learn a lot from environmental scientists.

Roadmap points Europe toward safer, sustainable chemicals

EU Commission releases ambitious strategy for getting hormone-disrupting chemicals out of food, products, and packaging.

Exempt from inspection: States ignore lead-contaminated meat in food banks

Hunter-donated meat provides crucial protein to US food banks. But an EHN investigation found a lack of oversight that could result in potentially hundreds of thousands of lead-contaminated meals this year.

How Europe’s wood pellet appetite worsens environmental racism in the US South

An expanding wood pellet market in the Southeast has fallen short of climate and job goals—instead bringing air pollution, noise and reduced biodiversity in majority Black communities.

Above The Fold

Daily & Weekly newsletters all free.