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LISTEN: EHN's Pittsburgh reporter discusses air pollution from U.S. Steel's Clairton Coke Works

LISTEN: EHN's Pittsburgh reporter discusses air pollution from U.S. Steel's Clairton Coke Works

PITTSBURGH—EHN's Pittsburgh reporter Kristina Marusic joined Allegheny Front's Kara Holsopple to talk about U.S. Steel's Clairton Coke Works, one of the biggest emitters of air pollution in Pennsylvania.


The facility, which converts coal into coke for use in steelmaking, has a long history of violating clean air laws and sickening residents of the surrounding neighborhoods in the Mon Valley, a cluster of townships along the Monongahela River 20 miles south of Pittsburgh. This Christmas, Mon Valley endured some of the stinkiest and most polluted air in the nation due to a combination of U.S. Steel's emissions and unusual weather patterns.

During the radio segment, Marusic discussed the ongoing air pollution issues, how climate change is making temperature inversions and "super pollution events" like these more common, and the details of a pending settlement agreement between U.S. Steel and local residents. Read the transcript or listen here.

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