Science Unfiltered: How a jar, an apple and fabric spurred a career in science

'Would you like to run an experiment?'

An invitation to do a simple experiment sparked Dr. Raquel Chamorro-Garcia's fascination with science.


The University of California, Santa Cruz, assistant professor tells us about this first experiment and her work deciphering the ways exposures to environmental pollutants affect current and future generations.

Check out the video above to hear why such research is critical to understanding our health.

Want to hear from more of tomorrow's science leaders? Check out EHN's ongoing series "Science Unfiltered" where we showcase young scientists working in green chemistry and environmental health fields. Science is cool!

Are you a young scientist who wants to share your story, your science, or your solutions for a better planet? We want to hear from you—contact editor Brian Bienkowski about ways to get involved.

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