Science Unfiltered: How a jar, an apple and fabric spurred a career in science

'Would you like to run an experiment?'

An invitation to do a simple experiment sparked Dr. Raquel Chamorro-Garcia's fascination with science.


The University of California, Santa Cruz, assistant professor tells us about this first experiment and her work deciphering the ways exposures to environmental pollutants affect current and future generations.

Check out the video above to hear why such research is critical to understanding our health.

Want to hear from more of tomorrow's science leaders? Check out EHN's ongoing series "Science Unfiltered" where we showcase young scientists working in green chemistry and environmental health fields. Science is cool!

Are you a young scientist who wants to share your story, your science, or your solutions for a better planet? We want to hear from you—contact editor Brian Bienkowski about ways to get involved.

Print Friendly and PDF
SUBSCRIBE TO EHN'S MUST-READ DAILY NEWSLETTER: ABOVE THE FOLD
From our Newsroom

And now, everything the country is not talking about ...

And here's at least one thing to do about it all.

The dangerous fringe theory behind the push toward herd immunity: Derrick Z. Jackson

Resumption of normal life in the United States under a herd immunity approach would result in an enormous death toll by all estimates.

My urban nature gem

Thanks to the Clean Water Act and one relentless activist, Georgia's South River may finally stop stinking.

Dust from your old furniture likely contains harmful chemicals—but there’s a solution

Researchers find people's exposure to PFAS and certain flame retardants could be significantly reduced by opting for healthier building materials and furniture.

How Europe’s wood pellet appetite worsens environmental racism in the US South

An expanding wood pellet market in the Southeast has fallen short of climate and job goals—instead bringing air pollution, noise and reduced biodiversity in majority Black communities.

Hormone-mimicking chemicals harm fish now—and their unexposed offspring later

Fish exposed to harmful contaminants can pass on health issues such as reproductive problems to future generations that had no direct exposure.

Above The Fold

Daily & Weekly newsletters all free.