LISTEN: EHN's Pittsburgh reporter featured on "We Can Be" podcast

"I believe that true, well-told stories have the power to change the world for good."

EHN's Pittsburgh reporter, Kristina Marusic, is featured on this week's episode of the Heinz Endowments' "We Can Be" podcast.


She discussed Fractured, her investigative series on fracking and health, the rise of "super pollution" events driven by climate change, and the ways that true, well-told stories can help change the world for good.

"We all know that when you're reading too much news you get depressed because it's all about problems and what's wrong with the world," Marusic says on the episode. "Covering solutions with the same rigor with which we cover problems is one way to help advance solutions ... I really try to do that in my reporting."

The podcast, hosted by Heinz Endowments* President Grant Oliphant, focuses on equity and social change. Previous guests include academic and activist Cornel West, civil rights activist DeRay McKesson, climate scientist Jonathan Foley (executive director of Project Drawdown), and writers Damon Young (journalist and author of "What Doesn't Kill You Makes You Blacker"), and Nell Edgington (author of "Reinventing Social Change: Embrace Abundance to Create a Healthier and More Equitable World").


* Editor's note: EHN.org receives funding from the Heinz Endowments, but our work remains independent from the foundation
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