What do politicians have to say about Pittsburgh's asthma epidemic?

What do politicians have to say about Pittsburgh's asthma epidemic?

"I almost feel like these statistics can't be real."

Following the publication of our four-part series Breathless: Pittsburgh's asthma epidemic and the fight to stop it, we reached out to politicians and lawmakers to hear their thoughts on how we can work together to improve the air.


Some were eager to talk. Some ignored us entirely. Others politely blew us off. A few interviews are still pending. We'll update this list as responses continue rolling in, so if you're a politician or policy-maker interested in sharing your thoughts, please get in touch.

Here are the responses we've gotten so far from a range of regional and state politicians (listed alphabetically by last name), along with contact info for those we haven't managed to speak with:

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