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Listen to the Landscape

A Listen into Landscape

A series of audio postcards spotlighting peace, place, and connection to landscape from the perspective of those working in nature.

Environmental coverage often paints a dismal picture: sea level rise flooding coastal communities, climate change and hurricanes destroying neighborhoods, or coal ash or hog waste seeping into local waterways and drinking water.


Of course, these issues are crucial to cover—but there's also beauty out there. A Listen into Landscape is a series of audio postcards spotlighting peace, place, and connection to landscape from the perspective of those working in nature.

This is a listen to people living their lives: An immersive experience into the soundscapes and personal narratives of those living off or working for the land.

Perhaps for you this is just a calming ASMR experience after a long day of remote work. Perhaps you will see your own appreciation for place and landscape reflected in these stories.

Led by reporter Cameron Oglesby, this audio project will highlight just how connected individuals and communities are to the natural spaces they call home.

Episodes

Community, Justice, and Legacy along the Patuxent River

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