Glyphosate breakfast cereal controversy: Is it safe to feed my children cereal for breakfast?

Consumers might not think their breakfast cereal could bring bits of pesticides to the kitchen table, but a new study links oats and oat-based snacks popular with children to a weed-killing poison found in Roundup.

Brent Wisner and Leah Segedie joined the Good Day L.A. crew to talk about breakfast cereal, Round Up weed killer and glyphosate: Should certain cereals be "off limits" in your household? How much of the controversy is hype and how much is fact?


Wisner is the attorney who won a $289 million award from Monsanto on behalf of a California school groundskeeper dying of cancer. A jury concluded that a weed killer made by Monsanto likely caused his disease.

Segedie is the "mommy blogger" behind Mamavation.com and author of "Green Enough," a how-to guide for parents struggling to make reasonably healthy choices amid the myriad confounding and conflicting choices and advice available (Full disclosure: EHN.org founder and chief scientist helped Segedie with the science).

Two takeaways from their conversation:

  1. Methods for evaluating chemicals in the United States is coming up short and needs to change, and
  2. Monsanto and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have too chummy a relationship, as evidenced by the legal documents Wisner unearthed in the Monsanto trial.

The full segment on Los Angeles' Fox 11 is worth a deeper listen, along with our Q&A with Segedie about her book.

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